Motel

Oren Ben Moreh / Motel

Opening: 22/12/2011   Closing: 27/01/2012

Motel, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Motel, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Motel, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Motel, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Stop, Pastel on Paper, 100x150cm, 2011
Firey, Pastel on Paper, 70x100cm, 2011
Drawing Room 2, Pastel on Paper, 70x100cm, 2011
Black Magic, Pastel on Paper, 70x100cm, 2011
Fountain, Pastel on Paper, 70x100cm, 2011

Have you already seen Oren Ben Moreh’s paintings? Maybe in a moment. In any case, you’ve come in, and that’s pleasing. Because these paintings, which have been revealed or will be revealed to you in a moment, draw you in to the remote regions of the human mind, to those moments that manage to elude the brain’s synapses. To moments of a partly chilling, partly welcomed quietness. In a cold and warm or warm and cold painting. But, did the painting invite you to enter? Did the painting let you gauge it in the moment of encounter? Because the paintings, seemingly, are concerned with things that anyway do not pertain to you: an elusive moment of meaningless prevarication, waiting for something whose time has already passed, things that disappear because no one sees them. Here is not home sweet home. Here is the intimacy of the other. And maybe you are familiar with the painting’s intimacy, which stems from the voyeuristic gaze into the private realm, that privacy that is concealed by and constructed from the layers of paint – what seems exposed actually demands excavation and discovery, since the painting in fact conceals more than it reveals. Maybe it is not necessarily love at first sight.

 

Have you asked yourself about the women appearing in the paintings? Or is that actually clear to you? Is there something feminine in the paintings? Maybe in the fact that they prevaricate and mull things over, bursting with a raging storm of yes or no? And maybe here something and nothing live under one roof, masculine in its insolence, in its charisma? Either way, like a dolled up lady, the paintings are heavily, suffocatingly made up – layers of makeup cover all the pores, making it impossible to breath, impossible to distinguish between a streak of light and a lighting fixture.

 

True, there are no borders in Ben Moreh’s paintings, but in spite of that, and maybe precisely because of that there is a struggle. And what a struggle! One territory in the painting features the occupied territories, so filled with paint that it peels off the paper, and on the other side – gentleness, painterly cunning that tries to create clear images. But these images too seem restrained, not to say ashamed, for having dared to raise their heads and emerge from within the painting. Like these images, the painting too has not made up its mind yet whether it wants to be revealed or to remain mysterious – the insolence of the color, the opaque glow of the pastel, stand as a counterweight against the painting’s qualms.

 

The inevitable result of this struggle, which is at the heart of the painting, is death. And indeed, you can think of Ben Moreh’s painting as a made-up corpse. It shows a ceaseless concern with death and the space it creates, with the lack that is highlighted by death rituals and by the consciousness of death that flickers without warning into people’s lives. Often you can ignore this concern, but not here. This is painting that resists the advertisement, the instant, the self-flattery and the information superhighways that dominate art. Honest painting, which looks death straight in the eye without wrapping it with tiresomeness and kitsch, and that doesn’t wish to shout or glorify the naturally underpowered.

 

Against this background, you might want to notice the small details, how much consolation they offer, the single cup that holds all the consolation (however small), painted in front of the figure’s blurry face. How material are the fire and the background, like the Cliffs of Moher struck by the ocean waves, and yet how airy and light. Flowers sent to spread joy but destined to wilt momentarily, the landscape paintings that dream of the pastoral – all everyday objects whose presence is meant to make life easier; a corporeal world, full of matter, that tries to lift the spirit. Like the paintings themselves, these objects are completely material, but they evoke all thatpersists in a human being’s spirit – not in the sublime but in the human, in the living.

 

If you like, you can say that these paintings reside in the twilight zone, and they do indeed wonderfully produce such a twilight zone. In fact, the paintings keep subtle balances – in color, texture, images, composition – in order to linger as long as possible in this twilight zone and emphasize its importance. You too might want to join them, lingering for a moment inside your vacillations, identifying with this sense of indecision and letting your mind wander aimlessly. To leave the safe ground of reliable knowledge.

 

Matan Daube

 

 

 

 

Double World One World

Egill Saebjornsson/ Double World One World

Opening: 28/10/2011   Closing: 02/12/2011

Double World One World, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Double World One World, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Double World One World, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Double World One World, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Double World One World, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011

 

Egill Saebjornsson was born in Reykjavik, Iceland, in 1973 and lives in Berlin. Solo exhibitions include shows at theKunstlerhaus Bremen,Watermill Center New York, Museum Fur Gegenwart Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin, Reykjavik Art Museum and HISK, Ghent. Saebjornsson was shortlisted for the 2010 Carnegie Art Award (international touring exhibition until May 2011). In 2010, Saebjornsson exhibited at Gottingen Kunstverein, Frankfurter Kunstverein, Neuer Sachsischer Kunstverein and Biennale for International Light Art, eastern Ruhr area, Germany.

 

Egill Saebjornsson’s video installations bear witness to a complex background across a range of media. His recent video installations have developed out of earlier painting and performance work where music and imagery blend, almost alchemically, and where mundane objects are brought to life as they are amalgamated with art. Egill’s art is a witty mix of genres where 19th-century tableaux vivants find their way to Sesame Street. Although humor and absurdity play a significant role in his work, they always have an underlying seriousness to them in which the artist’s logic and existential thoughts can be noted.

 

Saebjornsson arranges his found objects to form a series of tableaux onto which light is projected. However, the video projectors not only make visible the items that have been placed in the room on white pedestals; they project a second image layer onto them and the walls of the exhibition space, creating layers of other light, forms, and colors in movement, allowing the objects to take on new dimensions when seen through the flickering light images, playing with perception and meaning.

 

 

 

Falling Petals

Ori Gersht / Falling Petals

Opening: 01/09/2011   Closing: 20/10/2011

Falling Petals, Exhibition view, Daily News, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Falling Petals, Exhibition view, Daily News, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Falling Petals, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Falling Petals, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Falling Petals, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Speck 04, archival pigment, 39x40cm, 2010
Hanami02, archival pigment, 120x150cm, 2010
Isolated, archival pigment, 120x180 cm, 2010
Night Fly 01, archival pigment, 120x80cm, 2010
Coming Down 01, archival pigment, 100x150cm, 2010

Floating Petals – Japan 2010

For many centuries cherry blossoms were, and still are, highly significant in Japanese culture. The rich and complex meanings of these blossoms constitute a matrix of interrelated concepts, associated with renewal, the celebration of life and good fortune, but also predicated by the ephemeral nature of life, death and rebirth.

 

In other words, the symbol stands for process and relationships, not an isolated concept. In the 19th century, with the beginning of the Meiji era, when Japan begun its modernisation, militarization and colonial expansion, the symbolic meaning of the cherry blossoms was re-appropriated for nationalistic and military purposes. It is precisely because cherry blossoms stand for life, predicated by death and rebirth, that the Japanese military were able to tip the scales and exploit their symbolism in terms of death instead of life. For the imperial state, the virtue of cherry blossoms was not the life force represented by the petals as a full flower, but was instead the premature fall of the virginal petals as symbols of the sacrifice made by the young soldiers, since to die without clinging to life was a concept later introduced by the state to convince Kamikaze soldiers to plunge into death.

 

The symbolism of the cherry blossoms was transformed from full blooms as a life force to individual falling petals as a representation of the sacrifice of soldiers and their subsequent rebirth. The work that I produced in Japan between April and May 2010 meditates on the life and death dialectics that are symbolically imbedded in the life cycle of the cherry blossom. In the course of my journey I was moving between the cities of Tokyo and Hiroshima, both of which were damaged during World War II, and ancient locations and temples in the remote regions of west Japan. This geographical dichotomy allowed me to develop a visual dialectic between the historic and modern symbolism of the cherry blossom. The trees that I photographed in Hiroshima and Tokyo were all planted after the war.

 

In post A Bomb Hiroshima they are all fed from the nuclear contaminated soil, while in Tokyo they are often associated with death and nationalism, located in Kamikaze memorial shrines and around the imperial palace. In contrast, the trees that were photographed in the remote regions are ancient and were not affected by the war. These trees are often located in the vicinity of Buddhist temples and are associated with the force of life.

 

Solar Eclipse

Group Exhibition / Solar Eclipse

Opening: 14/07/2011   Closing: 12/08/2011

Solar Eclipse, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Solar Eclipse, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Solar Eclipse, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Solar Eclipse, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Solar Eclipse, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011

SOLAR ECLIPSE Group Exhibition

 

Oren Ben Moreh, Maya Bloch, Marik Lechner, Noga Shatz

 

The expression Solar Eclipse is comprised of 2 words: Solar – Sun, Eclipse – Disruption. A Solar Eclipse occurs when the Earth, the Moon and the Sun are situated on the same axis; the moon blocks the view of the Sun or part of it. A total Eclipse results in a complete obstruction of sunlight or what is known as Black Sun. Through out history the eclipse was considered to have a supernatural influence as a result of the fear it aroused.

 

The expression Black Sun is also a metaphorical and refers to one of the most common phenomenon’s of modern life: depression and melancholy. Most of the works in the exhibition possess the occurrence of disruption, a creative distortion of the chaotic world, reckless and mysterious. The exhibition as a whole is immersed in a black darkness, as if covering the works with a thick blanket. The works are compressed with layers upon layers that are created through expressive energy.

 

The Black, through its density and material quality, takes over everything, the unusual images flicker through, images connected to mythology and architypes, revealing psychological states and consciousness that shifts between reality and illusion, a place and no place. Oren Ben Moreh – Born in Israel 1982, Graduate of the Midrasha, 2004. Maya Bloch – Born in Israel 1978, MA Graduate, History of Art from the Tel Aviv University, 2004. Noga Shatz – Born in Israel 1978, Garduate of the Midrasha, 2007

Killing Time

Jossef Krispel / Killing Time

Opening: 28/05/2011   Closing: 02/07/2011

Killing Time, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Killing Time, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Killing Time, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Killing Time, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Untitled, Oil on canvas, 130x170cm, 2011
Untitled, Oil on canvas, 100x120cm, 2011
Untitled, oil on canvas, 120x150, 2011
Untitled, oil on canvas, 150x120cm, 2010
Untitled, oil on canvas, 130x150, 2011
Untitled, Oil on canvas, 70x90 cm, 2010

Jossef Krispel’s new Solo Exhibition includes video art, an artist’s book and a series of new paintings.

 

The exhibition is named after the video (KILLING TIME), which shows a dazing sequence of pornographic drawings. These drawings, created over the past two years (2010-2011), were scanned and united as a hard back book (of 350 pages) and became the works ‘origin’. The drawings derive from pornographic websites, interwoven amongst them are images from the artist’s photographs. By combining the works title three different interpretations are evident (Time to kill, Kill time and Time that kills), however the artist doesn’t account for its contents, he is interested in the world of images, time and photography – elements that characterize Krispel’s painting. The entire exhibition deals with a process, in the diligence of painting and drawing in the studio and in the underlying potential in the search after the existent; in both the reduction and expansion.

 

The video art is a varying loop, it’s duration is 11:10 and is composed of 220 drawings, accompanied by music taken from a Magnificat of Bach, called Fecit Potentium (in Latin: “He who has done”; glory song to the creator). The video is a kind of paraphrase of the book; an accelerated animation of pornographic drawings. From time to time the sequence is interrupted and a single drawing is shown for a fraction of time, in away that seems coincidental, clarifying the content of the images whose sequence is shuffled.

 

The new paintings encompass an evident return to photography as the source that painting is drawn from. In the lighting, framing and in their contemporary essence to evoke form and character. The portrayed images are taken from worlds that Krispel has wandered amongst over the past decade; dioramas, classical remnants, deer and birds, flora, portraits and different scenes from the artist’s photographs. In the current series, motivation is focused directly towards body and expression, the artist moves between the images like a photographer but acts amongst them like a painter.

 

The new paintings encompass an evident return to photography as the source that painting is drawn from. In the lighting, framing and in their contemporary essence to evoke form and character. The portrayed images are taken from worlds that Krispel has wandered amongst over the past decade; dioramas, classical remnants, deer and birds, flora, portraits and different scenes from the artist’s photographs. In the current series, motivation is focused directly towards body and expression, the artist moves between the images like a photographer but acts amongst them like a painter.

Daily News

Lea Avital / Daily News

Opening: 14/04/2011   Closing: 26/05/2011

Daily News, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Daily News, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Daily News, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Daily News, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Hearing problems, ping pong balls on newspaper ad, 30x30cm,2011
Daily News, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011

By Noami Aviv

 

It is the same minimal intervention that characterizes Lea Avital. It is the same loyalty to material and shape: loyalty and an obligation to detail, specifically and globally, and for the transformative potential that is hidden within. Lea Avital has the capability to capture situations that are both static and withhold the possibility for infinite movement. The potential multiplication is described in her capability to isolate identity and expose the confined other in the same identity.

 

A poetic flash, a gesture of laughter and thinning minutes transform Avital’s creations as easygoing, presentable and airy. Her works, as if they are drawn from her sleeve, maintain that aspect of magic and epistemological illusion: the figure from which they appear and disappear. They have an enduring tension between material and anti-material, inside and outside, movement and standstill, transparency and reflection. Between nothing, made out of sparse materials and that is content with no paint (black and white) and between something that seems loaded and rich and above every enigma. Every piece contains the same quality that is carried out through her contact with the common materials, one of which includes happening and creation. The same contact can be initiated through nature or circumstance. In this manner she has presented her photograph of a branch casting a shadow on a board of a basketball net that is situated in the yard. Avital’s photograph focuses on the meeting point between the shadow and the board, where the net should have been and is without. In this point of the net, there was either injury or a meeting between two things.

 

Things happen to her on the way, while walking, between things, while she is in awake, conscious and in an inert state of mind; a situation of repeated movement, movement that is closed inside itself, in other words, movement that describes a form, a shape and a concept. In order to explain this plainly we will imagine Lea walking, her actual action of walking as a looped mechanism. In the process of walking she collects and gathers objects that represent her general vibe, things that hint of the possibility of an infinite movement, feasible or imagined. Her motivation to collect, touch, divert, “to solve” or to photograph is the same motivation. The objects that are likely to interest her as objects will interest her also as photographs.

 

There is a bond between objects, photographs, drawings, prints. Actually everything seemingly works as a system that is almost closed and that the key to understanding is the model of repetition. The system is an installation which is positioned as a collection of fragments of prose, a collection of “contacts”, “connections”, “moments” which create the beating space in a mechanical simplicity. Beating as a simple pump. Like a heart.

Blank Rainbow

Eti Jacobi / Blank Rainbow

Opening: 24/02/2011   Closing: 08/04/2011

Untitled 13, acrylic on canvas, 100x100 cm, 2011
Untitled 8, acrylic on canvas, 100x100 cm, 2011
Untitled 7, acrylic on canvas, 100x100 cm, 2011
Untitled 10, acrylic on canvas, 100x120 cm, 2011
Untitled 6, acrylic on canvas, 100x100 cm, 2011
Untitled 3, acrylic on canvas, 100x100 cm, 2011
Untitled 11, acrylic on canvas, 100x100 cm, 2011

Shangri-La

Orit Raff / Shangri-La

Opening: 13/01/2011   Closing: 18/02/2011

Shangri-La, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Shangri-La, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Shangri-La, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Shangri-La, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2011
Untitled #6, lambda c-print, 74x100cm, 2009
Untitled, lambda c-print , 50x70cm, 2009
Untitled #3, lambda c-print, 50x70cm, 2009
Untitled (pool), lambda c-print, 110x150cm, 2009-2010

“I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men’s minds without their being aware of the fact.” — Claude Levi-Strauss, The Raw and the Cooked

 

Shangri-La—an imaginary earthly paradise, a fictional, mythological utopia in the Himalayas, was first described in James Hilton’s 1933 novel Lost Horizon: a happy, isolated place whose inhabitants are virtually immortal. Shangri-La is a Western invention, an Orientalist fantasy.

 

In my work I embark on a virtual journey into Shangri-La. From the website of a hotel chain named Shangri-La I borrowed PR and advertising images featuring interior spaces and artificial nature intended to attract tourists. I manipulated these images by erasing details such as tourists and waiters, and adding others of my own in their stead in a near-Sisyphean work process striving to generate tension between a luring paradise which abruptly turns into Hell; the fantasy of perfection dissolves. The hotels exist in the real world, but the images used to market them are a-priori processed and manipulated; images that strive to create a dream, to reconstruct a mythology by real means. The boundaries between fact and fiction become blurred; spaces ostensibly symbolizing perfection, tranquility, and idyll nature forthwith become threatening, uncanny, artificial, and hackneyed; the myth is shattered—furnishing me with a fertile ground for exploration.

 

I intentionally employ readymade, web-based images, rather than photographing the sites myself, since these loci are based on nonexistent mythological sites, much like my own journey. This work corresponds with previous works which explored bodily traces in various spaces—at home, school, etc. Here, the traces are the erasures and additions. Shangri-La is a constant quest for the unobtainable; a fantasy about another, far-removed, different place; a Sisyphean pursuit, symbolizing perfection and utopian ideals that do not exist.