Hogwarts

Group Exhibition / Hogwarts

Opening: 28/01/2010   Closing: 12/03/2010

Hogwarts, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2010
Hogwarts, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2010
Hogwarts, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2010
Hogwarts, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2010
Hogwarts, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2010

Gili Avissar, Roey Heifetz, Andrey Lev, Sagit Mezamer

 

‘Hogwarts’ is not a thematic exhibition: the thread connecting the four participating artists- Andrey Lev, Gili Avissar, Sagit Mezamer and Roey Heifetz- is hardly that of theme, technique or medium.

 

The four are recent graduates of the Bezalel Academy M.F.A and advanced studies program, whose works stood out at ‘Haroshet’ (“industry”), the 2009 graduation show.

 

In this aspect, ‘Hogwarts’ (named after the school of witchcraft from the ‘Harry Potter’ book series) is a kind of continuum of the ‘continuing studies’, a showcase that preserves something of the interactions and reciprocal influences typical of a framework of joint studies and artistic practice.

 

However, the grouping of these four artists in a new exhibition less than a year after their graduation show, consists not merely in marking a transitory phase for them, but also gives the opportunity to follow some fascinating artistic trends whilst they are emerging; for in ‘Haroshet’, one couldn’t help but sense a new and spectacular direction: risking a generalization, there appeared to be a turn from the text-image direction, one that is so common and familiar in Israeli art, to a different direction- that of image emerging from matter.

Animated Histories

Group Exhibition / Animated Histories

Opening: 25/10/2007   Closing: 14/12/2007

Animated Histories, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2007
Animated Histories, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2007
Animated Histories, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2007
Animated Histories, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2007
Animated Histories, Exhibition view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2007

Animated Histories: Qiu Anxiong, Robert Breer, Kota Ezawa, Cristina Lucas, Jenny Perlin, Shahzia Sikander, Kara Walker

 

Curated by Edna Moshenson

 

“Animated Histories” features works of contemporary artists using various techniques of animation – classical animation, digital and computerized – as an additional facet of their drawings, paintings and installations.

 

The internationally acclaimed artists participating in this exhibition are:

 

The Afro-American artist Kara Walker, born in 1969 in USA, Shahzia Sikander, born in 1969 in Lahor, Pakistan, lives and works for over twenty years in NY, Qiu Anxiong, born in 1972 in the Sichuan county in China, studied in Kassel in Germany, lives and works in Shanghai, Cristina Lucas, born in 1973 in Spain, lives and works in Madrid and Amsterdam, Kota Ezawa of Japanese-German parentage, born in 1969, lives and works in San Francisco since 1994, Jenny Perlin, born in 1970 in USA, and Robert Breer, one of the founders of experimental cinema, born in 1926 in USA.

 

The use of animation in the exhibited works is a natural and fundamental development evolving from the artists’ previous works in other media. Many contemporary artists, particularly those participating in the exhibition, use this medium in a subversive way. Relying on the features we attribute to animation – magic, fun, temptation, playfulness, humor, and poeticism – they use it as an instrument of presenting alternative historical narratives and as a channel for sharp social and political criticism.

 

The “Animated Histories” exhibition focuses on artists that combine in their works history and myth, reality and imagination; they animate, enliven and reconstruct repressed historical periods, traumatic historical and political events and complex social situations referring simultaneously to contemporary reality.

 

Kara Walker’s works contemplate the history of the American South during the period prior to the civil war and the struggle to emancipate the slaves. Shahzia Sikander looks into questions of cultural uniqueness in the post-colonial and multi-cultural society, and questions of feminine identity in a post-feminist society. Qiu Anxiong explores in his animation films the changes in the landscape of his country – rural and urban as well as social and political, the transfer from traditional to modern China, the Cultural Revolution and the post-communist era. Cristina Lucas shows in a colorful animation the changes in the map of the World from 500 BC till today caused by invasions, political alliances, explorations and wars. Kota Ezawa’s works focus on how the media influence the way latest historical events are etched in the collective memory. Jenny Perlin deals in her works with American paranoia and national traumas stemming from espionage and terrorism.

 

In the exhibited films the artists also refer to the history of cinematography and art, to Renaissance, to return and preservation of pre-cinematic techniques. At the same time, they use traditional techniques – paper cutouts and shadow theatre (Kara Walker), Indian-Persian miniatures (Shahzia Sikander), Chinese ink and wash drawings (Qiu Anxiong), abstract painting (Cristina Lucas), pop art (Kota Ezawa), and techniques of early experimental cinema (Jenny Perlin and Robert Breer) – in conjunction with digital techniques and newest animation and drawing software.

 

The animation films in the show maintain links between different media, between historical periods and cultural spaces distanced in time and place. They bear a fascination with the new technologies along with a romantic elegy to obsolete techniques and ways of expression, and an attempt to animate, enliven and preserve by digital means art forms threatened by the digital revolution.

 

All the works included in the exhibition were exhibited in a number of solo and group exhibitions during the past few years. Kara Walker’s films are also exhibited now in her solo exhibition in the Whitney Museum in NY and in the Venice Biennial. Cristina Lucas is participating in the Istanbul Biennial. Shahzia Sikander’s films were exhibited in the Venice and Istanbul Biennials. Kota Ezawa’s film was purchased by the NY MOMA and is exhibited there. Qiu Anxiong exhibited in the Shanghai Biennial.

 

The works are exhibited courtesy of the artists and their galleries: Kara Walker and Shahzia Sikander, Sikkema Jenkins &Co., New York; Cristina Lucas, Galeria Juana de Aizpuru, Madrid; Qiu Anxiong, Grace Li Gallery, Zurich; Kota Ezawa, Haines Gallery, San Francisco; Jenny Perlin, Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam

Paper

Group Exhibition / Paper

Opening: 06/09/2007   Closing: 19/10/2007

Paper, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2007
Paper, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2007
Paper, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2007
Paper, Installation view, Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, 2007

Lea Avital
Dror Daum
Nicole Eisenman
Nogah Engler
Max Friedmann
Eti Jacobi
Talia Keinan
Efrat Klipshtein
Elisheva Levi
Orly Maiberg
Rami Maymon
Tal Mazliah
Liav Mizrahi
Galia Pasternak
Yehudith Sasportas
Nati Shamia-Opher
Esther Shneider
Ralf Ziervogel
Alexandra Zuckerman

Landscape – Place, Non Place

Group Exhibition / Landscape – Place, Non Place

Opening: 30/10/2003   Closing: 29/11/2003

Roi Kuper , Untitled, Color print , 80x80cm , 2003
Mosh Kashi, Purple, Oil on canvas, 80x80cm, 2003
Ori Gersht ,Some place, C print ,100x80cm 2003
Orly Maiberg ,Untitled , Oil on canvas, 96x145cm, 2003
Gilad Efrat, Rujum Miri ,Oil on linen, 75x120cm, 1998
Maya Schindler , From Teletabies Series, Mixed Media on Paper ,72x52cm, 2002

Landscape – Place, Non Place.

 

Participants:

 

Ori Gersht
Roi Kuper
Gilad Efrat
Mosh Kashi
Orly Maiberg
Maya Schindler
Smadar Eliasaf
Hila lulu Lin

 

The term of “Place” contains an ambiguity. It refers both to the perception of the place and to a representation of it. This can be an actual place or a non-place The works all confront questions of the gaze, the language. It includes painting, photography, and video. The artists carry on a complex mutual relationship with the geographical, cultural, and ideological surroundings.

 

Touching on local myths, history, and culture, they discuss questions of land and territory, growth and stillness, nature without humankind. At times the gaze examines the surface from close-up, or takes a view from far away, as in aerial photography. At times it is the seemingly simple gaze of direct photography, touching the banal or imagined to describe the obvious, at others, the artists define visual and mental dialectic images from within the layered thought processes that provide a wide range of conceptual meanings.